Sunday, August 29, 2010

A Time Lapse Journey Through Japan by Brad Bremer

By Mike in Tokyo Rogers

Good Sunday morning! It's now 6:15 am on Sunday in Tokyo. It's a beautiful day and the morning brings the winds of early autumn to my window. I hope this day brings you bliss and some of your dreams, however great or small, closer to you.

For your Sunday pleasure, once again, I'd like to show you a wonderful time-lapse video I've found of Japan. This is beautiful.

It is by Brad Kremer. Enjoy

Hayaku: A Time Lapse Journey Through Japan from Brad Kremer on Vimeo.

Brad Kremer writes: 

Japan is one of the most beautiful countries in the world. This is my Japan. This is one of the many reasons why I love Japan. I shot this in many locations around Japan in the summer of 2009. Some of the location include Tokyo, Matsuyama, Imabari, Nagano, Gifu, and Ishizushisan.

I started this as a personal project to try and capture the beauty that I see in Japan. It started as just that...

But now that I have finished, I see it only as a beginning. This video, along with SAIJO MATSURI is just the start of a much larger project that I have now decided to do.

Saijo Matsuri 2009 西条祭り from Brad Kremer on Vimeo.
Saijo Matsuri link.

Anyone interested in helping fund/produce these dreams of Brad Kremer's please feel free to contact him and tell him Mike in Tokyo Rogers sent you:


Keywords: Mike Rogers, Marketing Japan, Tokyo, Time-lapse, Mike in Tokyo Rogers, Matsuri


Andy "In Japan" said...

Dear Mike,
Sugoi (wow)! Thanks for posting these Brad Kremer videos. Hayaku is so cool it sent chills down my spine. And in this beautiful country, even up north here, almost nothing else is cool or chilling. When oh when can we expect a break from the heat and humidity? My sweat glands are exhausted already!

Andy "In Japan" said...

Also, I really hope that people who have never been to Japan look at these videos and learn to appreciate the natural beauty, sense of asthetics, and maybe most importantly, the beauty of the people. Just get a look at all of those drunks at that Saijo festival. Happy drunks and lot's of 'em. Public drinking and having fun seem to be tolerated here and that is a reflection of the spirit and temperment of the wonderful Japanese people. No cops, no checking ID, no arrests, no night sticks needed. Is this tolerance real or just my imagination?

mikeintokyorogers said...

Andy, You and I need to collaborate in a LRC article. Seriously. You hit it on the head as to why this country is much better off than the USA.

Marc Abela said...

Thanks for the brilliant post. Breath taking, really. Late night (work mostly) it was and I end it on this video before I go to bed - could not ask for more.
I also share Andy's viewpoint - and care to go a bit further... Japan was up until very recently one rare and beautiful battalion of free enterprise, liberal thinking, private property and private responsibility, not just your name, but your whole family name directly on your brand, Honda-san, Matsushita-san, Suzuki-san, Toyoda-san, with free customers roaming around and simply picking the favorite amongst a sea of different products to be found on the market, it was competition at its best... and if people didn't like you, no-one there to use violence, you just go through periods where the group decides to ostracize you at best/worst... Rothbard would have loved this country.

mikeintokyorogers said...

Dear Marc,

I agree... As always, as the government expands itself and encroaches on our business and our personal responsibilities and private property, things break down - Including the family system and the free market...

Marc Abela said...

Hi Mike,
Allow me to push the argument a little further - men who row and fish on the outside of the boat (private sector) find it more and more difficult to feed a whole family, while men sitting in the middle of the boat (public sector) vegetablize themselves (sou-shoku-kei?) and grow in proportion, in the process slowing every day a little bit more the speed of the whole boat and making it more and more difficult for the private sector to row to keep the boat afloat and fish to feed all in the middle. Due to the lack of competition in the public sector and the over amount of competition in the private sector, most men loose their edge and/or their talent, and as a direct result, women tend to less trust men on a general social basis and find themselves choosing to work directly to provide for their own income. This translates into fewer kids per family, less couples, women wanting out of the system, more and more men not building up the strength to be able to support and feed a wife along with 3? 5? or even more kids, etc etc... A lot of people in Japan think that Chinese service is of a lesser quality, just because... well, just because, people there, are, well, see, they are "Chinese". Nothing to do with the geography or nationality if you ask anyone rational. People in China just spent decades bathing in a socially corrupt environment with tons of central planning and rotted ideas "a la" Mao - so the "social structure" was "the only" reason why Chinese are on average less up-to-date with "quality service" than some of their Japanese counterparts who have been used to "private competition". But the Chinese have been catching up (big time) in speed (at least since the end of the cultural revolution around 1976). Same with the Soviet Union. Many think the Soviet Union fell just because - well, see, it's easy, Soviet failed cause they were all... Russians. At least that's how most school books will almost attempt to portray things. Funny how so many today still think all they need to do is simply replace Lenine with someone smart and eloquent like Ozawa or with Obama to make it all work. Lenine spoke 7 languages. Not sure how many Obama & Ozawa speak but I bet the number is a tiny bit closer to... 1?
Hoping all is well,