Friday, April 13, 2012

Japan's Black Widow Sentenced to Death on Circumstantial Evidence?



I suspect that it is possible that a miscarriage of justice has been served in Japan with the guilty verdict of the so-called Black Widow murderer.


Here’s the story.
Today, Kanae Kijima, 37, was convicted of premeditated murder of three men aged 41, 53 and 80 for financial gain. Today, she was convicted of murdering her three former lovers in 2009 and has now been sentenced to death after a trial that lasted 100 days. The judge added that there was no room for leniency. She was found guilty of murder. She used the modus operandi of meeting the men on internet dating sites, becoming acquainted with them, then "borrowing" large sums of money from them. After that, it is claimed that she poisoned them with carbon monoxide by burning charcoal briquettes after giving them sleeping pills.


Strange thing is that the police and prosecutors have no solid evidence and admit it themselves! Read on...

Kijima says she is innocent and plans on appealing against the verdict.
The case has gained notoriety in Japan as the "Black Widow" case, named after the female spider that eats its partner after mating.

More than 1,000 people queued up for fewer than 50 seats at the court to hear the verdict.
"The defendant repeatedly committed quite serious crimes that claimed the lives of three people," the presiding judge, Kazuyuki Okuma, in Saitama district court, was quoted by the Kyodo news agency as saying.
"There is no room for leniency as the defendant committed the crimes for selfish purposes. She reiterated irrational excuses in court and did not show any remorse."

Prosecutors said she killed the men so she would not have to pay back the money they had given her.

The defence said the men had either committed suicide because Kijima broke up with them, or died accidentally.

Two of the three victims were found dead in their homes in Tokyo's Chiba prefecture. The third was found in a rented car in Saitama prefecture.

Why do I say that a miscarriage might have been served? Well, if you watch this news report (below), there is more evidence (well, actually less evidence!) The most damning part is that the prosecution even admits that there is no direct evidence linking her to the crime and no witnesses. I'm sure the woman is guilty of something because it seems that, even though she was convicted of the murder of the three men, there seems to be seven other charges that the court agrees with the police prosecutors and it seems the police do have evidence for. They don't say exactly what those charges are but I'm assuming those are charges of fraud, etc. 

video

Nevertheless, according to the police prosecutor (at 2:19), "There is no direct evidence (on the murders) but if you put together the pieces of the puzzle, then you can see how she is guilty." Oh really? To tell the truth, after 3 guys die when associating with her, and after giving her lots of money, I'm pretty sure she might be guilty of something and up to no good (and I'm not claiming that she is innocent) but without solid irrefutable proof of some sort then this sounds like circumstantial evidence. I don't think the courts can legally find someone guilty with only circumstantial evidence, can they?

Doesn't it sound like only circumstantial evidence to you?


Of course, Kijima and her lawyers have said that they will appeal. I think that another judge in a higher court will reverse this ruling of premeditated murder. Sure, I think she did it too, but just thinking someone did something wrong is not the same as proving without a shadow of a doubt.


This is a miscarriage of justice. This decisions will be overturned. She's going to jail for different charges.

2 comments:

diego.a said...

The real miscarriage of justice is how DC madams don't have her number! Imagine world peace breaking out after she gets done "dating" on Capitol Hill.

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Anonymous said...

And THis is why I live in a state that has No death penalty.

The death penalty is barbaric and fixes nothing.

If my better half finds reason enough and "off's" me I don't want any slick-back no-good lawyer and his/her partner in crime (judge) to do a damn thing to her. Even If she Is guilty!

wHAt? I don't get last wishes?

Can I write that into my will?

From my perspective the D.A. and the judge in the MJ article are doing nothing more than profiting from murder. Kind of like the D.A.'s sipping coffee in Iowa just looking for something to twist, via comments on the article, The Predators of Marengo County:
http://blogs.desmoinesregister.com/dmr/index.php/tag/jay-rodney-lewis/

- clark